Scientists working at physical containment level four (PC4), the highest level available.

Safeguarding Australia

Providing an integrated approach to Australia's national biosecurity combining world-leading scientific expertise with cutting-edge diagnostic, surveillance and response capabilities.

Refuges harbour pests and beneficial insects

That refuge crops, planted near Bt cotton to prevent resistance developing, also support significant populations of secondary pests and beneficial species is argued in this article from Farming Ahead. (3 pages)

Paterson's curse

Paterson’s curse is an introduced plant and considered both a valuable pasture species and a toxic weed, out competing other plants and poisoning livestock. Several biological control agents have been released in Australia since the late 1980s to help control this weed.

Worm study will help future parasite control

This article from Farming Ahead discusses CSIRO research on genetic and physical variations between different strains of Barber’s pole worm which should help producers develop better management strategies to minimise the impact of this parasite. (3 pages)

The impact of weeds on rainforests following Cyclone Larry

Severe Category 4 Tropical Cyclone Larry hit the North Queensland coast in 2006 causing extensive destruction to rainforest habitats in the Wet Tropics. The widespread disturbance caused by the cyclone provided ideal conditions for rapid recruitment and spread of invasive weeds in Queensland’s rainforests.

Seed longevity of Carduus nutans in Australia

This one-page poster discusses the results of seed longevity experiments for nodding thistle and the consequences for managing this weed in south-eastern Australia.

Eradicating pest ants from the Top End

CSIRO scientists lead research into the ecology, impacts and control of invasive ant species in northern Australia. A successful eradication project in Kakadu has paved the way for CSIRO leadership of a range of other pest ant management projects.

Foot-and-mouth disease global initiative

AAHL staff are actively involved in an international alliance aimed at developing new vaccines, diagnostic tests and antiviral drugs for foot-and-mouth disease.

Farming Ahead: CSIRO and related articles from 2007

Farming Ahead magazine regularly features CSIRO and related research for the agricultural sector. This is a list of articles published in the magazine throughout 2007.

Dr Greg Smith: ensuring the containment of animal disease agents

Dr Greg Smith is responsible for microbiological and disease security at CSIRO's Australian Animal Health Laboratory (AAHL) in Geelong, Victoria.

Original climate benchmark makes a comeback

An original climate benchmark first identified for South Australian farmers in the 1860’s –Goyder’s Line – is on the move, according to a review by scientists and primary producers.

Dr Mark Lonsdale: Director, CSIRO's Biodiversity Portfolio

Dr Mark Lonsdale has extensive experience in the ecology of invasive species and biodiversity.

Blue mussels lead to barnacle free boats (Podcast 11 Dec 2009)

New methods to reduce the growth of plants and animals on surfaces immersed in water, such as ship hulls, are being developed by a team of scientists from CSIRO. (4:24)

Mitigation of disease impact

CSIRO researchers are developing novel strategies and products that will limit the spread of major animal diseases.

A cow jumped over the genome (Podcast 29 Apr 2009)

Groundbreaking findings by an international consortium of scientists who sequenced and analysed the bovine genome, could result in more sustainable food production. (5:34)

Dr Garry Cook: tropical savanna ecology and management

Dr Garry Cook has more than 25 years experience in researching the sustainable management of tropical savanna landscapes, with an emphasis on the role of fire in savanna dynamics and landscape processes.

Ecosystem Sciences PhD program

The PhD program at CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences offers university students an opportunity to conduct research with leaders in science.

Termites get the vibe on what tastes good (Podcast 26 Mar 2007)

Dr Ra Inta explains how termites are able to distinguish between two different foods, without seeing, tasting or touching them, in this six-minute podcast. (6:29)

CSIRO aids tsunami recovery (Podcast 12 Mar 2007)

Discover how CSIRO’s been at the forefront of the post-tsunami reconstruction effort on the island of Pra Thong, off Thailand’s west coast in this three minute podcast. (3:07)

Armidale, NSW (FD McMaster Laboratory)

Research at FD McMaster Laboratory develops tools for breeders of sheep and cattle to optimise profitability, livestock welfare and on-farm decision support systems, resulting in more efficient animals and better management practices. CSIRO’s FD McMaster Laboratory conducts research to optimise profitability, livestock welfare and on-farm decision support systems.

Dr Alexie Papanicolaou: enabling next-generation molecular ecology with genomics and informatics

Dr Alexie Papanicolaou is enabling genomics for non-model species, such as the cotton bollworm (Helicoverpa sp.), eucalyptus and fruit flies (Bactrocera sp.) in order to assist research in agriculture, ecology and evolutionary biology.

Dr Wolfgang Spielmeyer: identifying and cloning wheat genes for yield improvement

Dr Wolfgang Spielmeyer is mapping and isolating important wheat genes for durable disease resistance and greater harvest index to understand underlying mechanisms and to develop markers that will assist in breeding of wheat cultivars.

Mr Kevin Hennessy: analysing the regional impacts of climate change

Mr Kevin Hennessy is analysing observed climate data, developing Australian climate projections from computer simulations, assessing the potential impacts and exploring adaptation options.

Flying foxes out for an evening feed

A video showing flying foxes heading out for an evening feed at Atherton in Far North Queensland. (0:45)

Fighting frog fungus

Australian scientists, including a team at CSIRO, were first to identify a fungus as the cause of mass frog declines in Australia and Panama.

Dead or alive – bridal creeper is bad for environment

Bridal creeper, a native of southern Africa, is an attractive plant once much loved by gardeners. Now it is one of southern Australia’s worst environmental weeds. It smothers native vegetation and its huge tuber mats prevent germination of native plants.

Page 1 of 27